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Archive for January, 2014

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Optimizing Water and Wastewater Operations via the Industrial Internet

Written by Alan Hinchman

OWC blog 1Enter the world of water utilities: aging infrastructure, declining revenues, increasing service level expectations, and regulations. What’s more, resources for water and wastewater capital programs are limited, making it difficult to carry out infrastructure modernization, expansion, and technology upgrades.

How can you address these critical challenges while delivering the best return on investment to ratepayers or private sector investors?

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The Physical and Financial Consequences of Our Failing Infrastructure

Written by Vincent Caprio

CaptureThe effects of our country’s crumbling water infrastructure manifest as concerns both physical and financial in nature. Every day, hundreds of water mains break due to overlooked cracks, and over the last 10 years, the price of water has increased by about 50 percent due to infrastructure issues.

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Is Water Really Priced for Its True Economic Value?

Written by Ralph Exton

water scarcityAccording to the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations, water scarcity already affects almost every continent and more than 40 percent of the people on our planet. By 2025, 1.8 billion people will be living in countries or regions with absolute water scarcity, and two-thirds of the world’s population could be living under water stressed conditions.

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From Macro to Micro, How We Must Design Water’s Future

Written by Richard Tomlinson

From large scale urban planning to a single building project, macro design strategies need to start at a micro level. While each individual building contains a different maze of pipes, when taken together, we build a neighborhood. From there, we work out way out to a community and then if we keep expanding, we find the water source—it’s not just a pipe in the ground, it’s coming from somewhere.

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